One Simple Habit That Can Transform Your Life

Tim Parkins
6 min readJan 27, 2023

Journalling is a powerful tool for helping achieve success, both personally and professionally. It can help you explore your thoughts and feelings, lower your stress levels, and gain valuable insights. The best part is that it is a very low-cost and simple habit to implement that can propel you forward.

Benefits of journalling.

  1. Journalling can provide clarity and focus. We usually have all kinds of thoughts swirling around in our mind, and thoughts bounce around and collide like the snow inside a snow globe. That makes it very difficult to see what is going on; there is simply too much happening. Writing your thoughts and feelings can help you calm the noise in your mind, bringing greater clarity.
  2. A journalling practice can help you identify and manage stress. Writing your feelings can help you process and reflect on difficult situations, allowing you to better manage your stress. It can also help you identify potential areas of improvement and strategies for managing stress. Since you will be the only one that reads it, you can freely vent; journalling can provide an outlet for you to get the emotions out, causing no harm to your relationships.
  3. Journalling can help you connect things you hadn’t connected before to unlock new insights. It is amazing how ideas will inter-relate once you take the time to get them out of your head. Once you see your ideas in the open, you can play with them and allow them to intermingle with other thoughts and feelings.
  4. A consistent journalling habit unlocks your ability to “time travel”, which is one of the tremendous benefits that I have experienced. When you spend a few minutes each day capturing how you feel, what is on your mind, and what you are struggling with or feeling great about, you are amassing a lot of information. I go back at the end of each month and scan through my entries for the month. This helps me see how much progress I have made. My usual tendency is to feel that I haven’t accomplished as much as I would have liked, so going back and seeing how far I’ve come and what I’ve learned along the way is a real positive. I write up a “monthly summary” that I review at the end of the year as well. Being able to get a bird’s-eye view of how you felt and what you were focused on over a…

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Tim Parkins

Career Coach & Work Architect. I help successful but unhappy professionals craft a working life that works for them. https://timparkins.com